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On the Farm

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Upcoming Events
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Fun Farm Facts
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Sunlight Hours and Egg Production

Did you know that chickens must have a certain amount of light coming through the pupils of their eyes each day in order to consistently lay eggs?  If the light the chickens receive drops below 14 hours a day there is a drastic decrease in egg production.  Not only that, but the wavelengths of light found in sunlight are needed by the hens in order to produce an appreciable amount of Vitamin D in the egg yolks.  For eggs high in Vitamin D as well as Vitamin A, choose eggs from pastured hens.

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Friends of the Farm Day
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Friends of the Farm Day

          Once a year in the spring Mike and Connie Hale invite the friends of Windy Meadows Family Farm to an afternoon of learning and relaxation. There are hayrides and walking tours to show the different working areas of the farm and explain how they are integrated and sustainable.  Those that would like to are invited to bring a covered dish and enjoy a "pot blessing" in the evening.  The atmosphere is very laid-back and country casual. 

 

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This Season on the Farm
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          Starting the week of March 23 we will start harvesting chickens from the farm.  We now have eggs in the incubator, chicks in the brooder, small chickens in the open-ended hoop houses and as soon as the weather stays permanently warm, we will begin to move chickens into the open-sided "sleds".  Yes, everything's coming up chickens!   

          A few new cows with grass-based genetics have joined our herd from a totally grass-based farm in Oklahoma: Ron Crain's Wagon Creek Farm.  Mike did experience some excitement on the 6-hour return trip back to Texas, though.  Sometime after dark he had called on his cell phone to tell me he was only 30 minutes away from home but had been made to detour off of the state highway he was traveling because a serious auto accident had shut the highway down. He was now traveling on an unfamiliar maze of tiny county roads.  He asked if I could help him find his way back to the main highway as he did not have his county road map with him. No, he did not remember the number of the county road by which he had left the highway.  So there he was, left to fend for himself, driving in the dark, with a trailer full of big, tired, thirsty animals on unfamiliar rural roads.  No one who has not lived in the country can appreciate the thrill of traveling at night on roads that can rapidly change from oil dirt, to gravel, to mud, or worse, flooded.  Did I mention another storm was heading our way? I was never so glad as to see Mike that evening when he finally arrived home.  We eased the cows into a makeshift paddock for the night until man and beast could acquaint themselves better by daylight.

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Windy Meadows Family Farm
"The Natural Choice for the Best-Tasting Chicken"
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